The Reality of Domestic Violence Part II

My last post was very long, so I decided to divide up the information because I wanted to make sure I shared some statistical information I found on futureswithoutviolence.org:

~>On average more than three women a day are murdered by their husbands or boyfriends in the United States.  In 2005, 1,181 women were murdered by an intimate partner.

~>In 2008, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published data collected in 2005 that finds that women experience two million injuries from intimate partner violence each year.

~>Nearly one in four women in the United States reports experiencing violence by a current or former spouse or boyfriend at some point in her life.

~>Women are much more likely than men to be victimized by a current or former intimate partner.

~>Women are 84 percent of spouse abuse victims and 86 percent of victims of abuse at the hands of a boyfriend or girlfriend and about three-fourths of the persons who commit family violence are male.

~>There were 248,300 rapes/sexual assaults in the United States in 2007, more than 500 per day, up from 190,600 in 2005. Women were more likely than men to be victims; the rate for rape/sexual assault for persons age 12 or older in 2007 was 1.8 per 1,000 for females and 0.1 per 1,000 for males.

~>The United States Justice Department’s Bureau of Justice Statistics estimates that 3.4 million persons said they were victims of stalking during a 12-month period in 2005 and 2006.  Women experience 20 stalking victimizations per 1,000 females age 18 and older, while men experience approximately seven stalking victimizations per 1,000 males age 18 and older.

~>Approximately one in three adolescent girls in the United States is a victim of physical, emotional or verbal abuse from a dating partner – a figure that far exceeds victimization rates for other types of violence affecting youth.

~>One in five tweens – age 11 to 14 – say their friends are victims of dating violence and nearly half who are in relationships know friends who are verbally abused. Two in five of the youngest tweens, ages 11 and 12, report that their friends are victims of verbal abuse in relationships.

~>Teen victims of physical dating violence are more likely than their non-abused peers to smoke, use drugs, engage in unhealthy diet behaviors (taking diet pills or laxatives and vomiting to lose weight), engage in risky sexual behaviors, and attempt or consider suicide

~>15.5 million children in the United States live in families in which partner violence occurred at least once in the past year, and seven million children live in families in which severe partner violence occurred.

~> The majority of nonfatal intimate partner victimizations of women (two-thirds) in the United States occur at home.

~>Children under age 12 are residents of the households experiencing
intimate partner violence in 38 percent of incidents involving female victims.

~> In a single day in 2008, 16,458 children were living in a domestic violence shelter or transitional housing facility. Another 6,430 children sought services at a non-residential program.

~>Women who have experienced domestic violence are 80 percent more likely to have a stroke, 70 percent more likely to have heart disease, 60 percent more likely to have asthma and 70 percent more likely to drink heavily than women who have not experienced intimate partner violence.

~>In the United States in 1995, the cost of intimate partner rape, physical assault and stalking totaled $5.8 billion each year for direct medical and mental health care services and lost productivity from paid work and household chores. When updated to 2003 dollars, the cost is more than $8.3 billion.

~>Sexual and domestic violence are linked to a wide range of reproductive health issues including sexually transmitted disease and HIV transmission, miscarriages, risky sexual health behaviour and more.

 

Again, before we engage in jokes or solely look at this issue through our fascination with celebrities, remember everyday people are victims of violence and this is no laughing matter. Educate yourself and then educate others. You may just save a life.

 

Source: http://www.futureswithoutviolence.org/userfiles/file/Children_and_Families/DomesticViolence.pdf

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Cyclical

I don’t understand why so many people complain about how Black women are portrayed on reality television when the same people who complain are the ones patronizing the shows!!!! These shows are a business and in business, everything is about the bottom line, therefore, if it’s not making the company money; it will go away. The more you tune in, the more ratings they will have, which will lead to more money. It’s simple mathematics. Supply and demand. No matter how you slice it.

So the real question becomes, “why do you watch it?” Those who know me know I haven’t had cable in over 2 years because when I returned to school I decided to rid myself of it because television became nothing more than a distraction. The deal I made with myself is that I would not sign up for cable again until after I graduated. Well, now that I’ve graduated I still can’t logically convince myself to pay for cable. Anything I really want to watch, I can watch online for free. Hell, all I really have to do is look at my Facebook timeline and I know exactly what happened. There isn’t much substance on television today and I don’t think many would argue with me about that.

You call it guilty pleasure. A way to release from your everyday life and unwind with something that is completely ridiculous and will allow you not to use any brain cells. I get that, as I’m guilty of the same. What I DON’T get are the people who complain about it week after week after week. It’s like complaining about how much a broken bone hurt and yet not going to the doctor to do anything about it.

If you’re going to watch it, watch it, but don’t then get on a soapbox platform and discuss the ills it creates for the image of Black women, especially if you’re a Black woman contributing to the increasing of its bottom line.